BlastOne

Installing a Blasting Chamber

What is involved in installing a successful Blasting Chamber.

Overview

The first feature, and one of the most important is the chamber itself. Efficient and productive blast chambers always include good lighting, rugged doors and heavy duty lining to resist abrasion.

A correctly planned and installed ventilation system and dust collection provide sufficient airflows in the blast room to keep dust levels low, increase operator visibility and to quickly clear the room of dust when blasting ceases. A critical component to ensure adequate air flow is the inlet and exhaust plenums, they effectively control the amount of air and the path that the air will take through the blast chamber.

An abrasive recovery system, normally under-floor, conveys the spent abrasive to a central point for recycling and cleaning. An underfloor recovery system will recover automatically from all or part of the floor, depending on the design. The abrasive recycling and cleaning unit will clean the used abrasive by separating dust, fines, paint flakes and trash from the good reusable abrasive. The abrasive is then stored ready to be used again.

Blasting pots, hoses and nozzles are selected to suit the blast room function. Typically, multiple outlets are installed to allow more than one operator to blast continuously. Alternatively, robotics can be installed for automated blasting and improved operator safety.

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Important information regarding Blastrooms